appetite for apathy

ask me anything...can't promise i'll answer though ;)    just a collection of things i like. i am a humble curator and claim no ownership of any of the images you see on this site.

chi-town :)

twitter.com/redrunna:


    fastcompany:

What Happens To Our Brains When We Exercise And How It Makes Us Happier
Most of us are aware of what happens to the body when we exercise. We build more muscle or more stamina. We feel how daily activities like climbing stairs becomes easier if we exercise regularly. When it comes to our brain and mood though, the connection isn’t so clear.
Read More>

    fastcompany:

    What Happens To Our Brains When We Exercise And How It Makes Us Happier

    Most of us are aware of what happens to the body when we exercise. We build more muscle or more stamina. We feel how daily activities like climbing stairs becomes easier if we exercise regularly. When it comes to our brain and mood though, the connection isn’t so clear.

    Read More>

    — 2 hours ago with 120 notes
    molls:

All my friends have high cholesterol

    molls:

    All my friends have high cholesterol

    (via crushedbytheboring)

    — 3 hours ago with 953 notes
    wannabepoesie:

andropomorphine:

americankopite:

Dude, I don’t know if anybody told you, but we have this little thing called physics.

I had to reblog this again…

Oh

    wannabepoesie:

    andropomorphine:

    americankopite:

    Dude, I don’t know if anybody told you, but we have this little thing called physics.

    I had to reblog this again…

    Oh

    (Source: yodiscrepo, via twerknugget)

    — 3 hours ago with 106740 notes

    Deadpan (Steve McQueen, 1997)

    Turner Prize-winning artist Steve McQueen—now best known for his feature films, Hunger, Shame, and 12 Years a Slave—put himself in the line of fire in Deadpan (1997), a restaging of Buster Keaton’s falling house gag from Steamboat Bill Jr. McQueen does more than remake the stunt; his presence as a black man transforms the work into a commentary on race relations and the precariousness of the black experience. 

    "Damage Control: How Artists Destroy to Create Art"

    (Source: adrowningwoman, via blackfilm)

    — 21 hours ago with 1784 notes

    chicagobusiness:

    image

    Meet Lupe Fiasco’s creative inner circle.

    -A curator at a world-famous art museum

    -Well-known Chicago entrepreneur 

    -DJ who heads new media at Mr. Fiasco’s record label

    -Marketing exec

    -Avant-garde fashion designer

    -Ethiopian-born singer heavily involved in philanthropy

    These are six people who help shape Lupe’s success. 

    — 22 hours ago with 11 notes

    "i used to be addicted to soap but i’m clean now"

    "a moon rock tastes better than an earth rock because its meteor"

    "a backwards poet writes inverse" 

    — 1 day ago with 1 note
    #last of us  #corny ass jokes  #love it 
    dailyactress:

Dame Dash, Nicole Richie, Jay Z, & Rashida Jones

    dailyactress:

    Dame Dash, Nicole Richie, Jay Z, & Rashida Jones

    — 1 day ago with 76 notes
    vicemag:

Owning Porno Used to Mean Something, Damnit
1. When I was in high school I kept my porn in a white box. Inside the box was a stack of magazines—almost entirely Playboys, because I liked the clean stuff—as well as a purple folder full of the images I liked best, so that I could spread them out on my bedroom floor and sit in the middle of them, kind of like a crude manual version of Tumblr. 
2. The internet really changed the way people masturbate. Today, if you want to see someone naked you just press the buttons and poof, there’s a boob. But as a teenager I remember thinking of pictures of naked women as a kind of secret relic, something you had to search out, anticipate and covet, which made them that much better when you got them.
3. I saw my first porn magazine in fourth grade when some kids in my class were passing one around under the lunch table. I remember feeling a weird sense of doom, like I was going to get caught the second I touched the paper, even though everyone else was laughing about it. I’m not sure what magazine it was, but the pictures were of naked women holding automatic weapons, dressed up like military personnel. I remember the feeling of seeing more than I actually saw.
4. The kid who owned that magazine briefly ran a business where you could buy a page out of other, similar magazines for a dollar. He carried them around in a duffel bag with a padlock on it. They were his dad’s magazines, he said, and there were more where those came from, if you had the money. I never bought one. Eventually he was caught and suspended. 
5. I used to occasionally go to work with my dad. I remember feeling an insane sense of agency whenever he would stop at this one gas station that had a rack of tattoo magazines with tits in them. I would stand in front of the rack and wait until I knew I had half a second with no one watching, and then I would open the magazine as if I didn’t mean to, in case someone caught me. So instead of full visions, I caught flashes and tried to embed them deep in my memory so that I would be able to see them for a long time afterward whenever I shut my eyes.
6. A very brief, insanely vivid memory from when I was probably four or five, of picking up a magazine my dad’s friends were passing around at a camp in the woods, and the men laughing as my dad took it away from me before I could see. I remember my uncle saying something to the effect of, “one day you can have that,” and everyone laughing. I don’t remember many other things from that early stage in my life.
Continue

    vicemag:

    Owning Porno Used to Mean Something, Damnit

    1. When I was in high school I kept my porn in a white box. Inside the box was a stack of magazines—almost entirely Playboys, because I liked the clean stuff—as well as a purple folder full of the images I liked best, so that I could spread them out on my bedroom floor and sit in the middle of them, kind of like a crude manual version of Tumblr. 

    2. The internet really changed the way people masturbate. Today, if you want to see someone naked you just press the buttons and poof, there’s a boob. But as a teenager I remember thinking of pictures of naked women as a kind of secret relic, something you had to search out, anticipate and covet, which made them that much better when you got them.

    3. I saw my first porn magazine in fourth grade when some kids in my class were passing one around under the lunch table. I remember feeling a weird sense of doom, like I was going to get caught the second I touched the paper, even though everyone else was laughing about it. I’m not sure what magazine it was, but the pictures were of naked women holding automatic weapons, dressed up like military personnel. I remember the feeling of seeing more than I actually saw.

    4. The kid who owned that magazine briefly ran a business where you could buy a page out of other, similar magazines for a dollar. He carried them around in a duffel bag with a padlock on it. They were his dad’s magazines, he said, and there were more where those came from, if you had the money. I never bought one. Eventually he was caught and suspended. 

    5. I used to occasionally go to work with my dad. I remember feeling an insane sense of agency whenever he would stop at this one gas station that had a rack of tattoo magazines with tits in them. I would stand in front of the rack and wait until I knew I had half a second with no one watching, and then I would open the magazine as if I didn’t mean to, in case someone caught me. So instead of full visions, I caught flashes and tried to embed them deep in my memory so that I would be able to see them for a long time afterward whenever I shut my eyes.

    6. A very brief, insanely vivid memory from when I was probably four or five, of picking up a magazine my dad’s friends were passing around at a camp in the woods, and the men laughing as my dad took it away from me before I could see. I remember my uncle saying something to the effect of, “one day you can have that,” and everyone laughing. I don’t remember many other things from that early stage in my life.

    Continue

    — 1 day ago with 218 notes